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Chinese Punctuation Marks ⁉️

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Chinese Punctuation Marks ⁉️

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Chinese Punctuation Marks ⁉️

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Portuguese Language Manager 1 month, 1 week ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #18357
    Community Manager

    Chinese punctuation marks are used to organize and clarify written Chinese. Chinese punctuation marks are similar in function to English punctuation marks but sometimes differ in the form or

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  • #18385
    Jeni Z

    Little-Known Punctuation Marks We Should Be Using

    INTERROBANG
    You probably already know the interrobang, thanks to its excellent moniker and popularity (You did what!? or You don’t read Mental Floss?!).

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  • #18405
    Vera lucia P

    Sometimes an exclamation mark, question mark, or comma may not be enough to express what you want when writing. And sometimes being grammatically correct may prevent you from expressing precisely what

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  • #18423
    Carla S

    CARET

    The word “caret” is Latin for “it lacks.” The caret is mainly used to indicate something that’s missing from the original text. Many editors, English teachers, and students alike are usually

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  • #18432
    Portuguese Language Manager

    DOUBT POINT

    This punctuation indicates doubt. So, instead of using a string of question marks at the end of a statement a writer is unsure about, such as “We’re going to the store now???” he or

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  • #18440
    Jeni Z

    Fist (Manicule)
    First, let’s wade through the numerous names for this punctuation mark. The names reflect the fact that the symbol is a hand. There’s fist, printer’s fist, bishop’s fist, hand,

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  • #18508
    Vera lucia P

    THE SNARK MARK

    It was created around 2007 by American typographer Choz Cunningham as an end-of-sentence mark that could denote verbal irony in writing. Its intended use is to help readers understand

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  • #18518
    Carla S

    BECAUSE SIGN

    This one’s so cool. It’s like the “Therefore” sign, but upside-down, and it means because.

    SECTION SIGN

    The section sign, §, is a typographical glyph for referencing individually numbered

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  • #18534
    Portuguese Language Manager

    QUESTION COMMA

    The interrogative version of its best friend the Exclamation Comma.

    According to the Huffington Post, Leonard Storch, Ernst van Haagen, and Sigmund Silber created both the exclamation

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